Ambush of the Wobblegong

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Watch out for the Tassel Attack

The Tasselled wobble gong Has one of the most fantastic species names I’ve come across and its a name that just keeps on giving with this intriguing shark. It’s Latin name Eurcrossorhinus dasypogon roughly translates as well fringed nose with shaggy beard. Talk about saying it like it is! That is certainly a well suited name for this odd species of shark. I mean looking at the picture above, its not what most people would conjure into their heads when they hear the word shark. So, the big question. Why does the Tasselled Wobble gong look so odd?

Well the answer is, that the Tasselled wobble gong makes its version of bread and butter by ambushing its unsuspecting prey. Now, to be successful it makes sense that the shark would adopt the camouflage tactic. Which it did, it evolved over time to look like the coral reef habitat it calls home. In fact, Its disguise is so good the tasselled wobble gong has become a supreme in the ambush arena. But this species of wobble gong doesn’t just rely on chance to catch their tea. Oh no! They have one or two tricks hidden in their gills to keep them from getting hungry…

Trick (or adaptation) number one: They are able to super focus their eyes on a particular spot, to make sure they strike right every time.

Trick number two:  The tail lure. They swish their tale as a lure for small unsuspecting fish then Wham! They are sucked into the sneaky wobble gongs mouth before the fish can say “What happened there? or “No! I want to live” (or whatever you can imagine the little fish saying to a bigger, sneaky fish attempting to suck him into its mouth like a hoover).

Any who, I digressed there a little… I perhaps should explain the hoover analogy? The shark causes a change in water pressure when it opens its mouth, so once the poor little fish is lured close to the mouth all the wobble gong has to do is open it and the water pressure change takes care of the rest. Sucking the fish down into its gaping crevice. There, that will do nicely on the Tassels attack. I’ll leave you with a few more comments on the Tasselled wobble gongs little known natural history and then we are done here.

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The Wobble Range

The wobbles range is The Eastern Indian ocean and the Western – Central Pacific ocean; around Indonesia, Papua New guinea and western Australia. They are found at depths of 40 metres and are bottom dwelling sharks, that are mainly associated with coral reefs (which makes sense considering the way they look. They would soon be picked off by bigger fish themselves if they flaunted around the mid ocean looking like that.) Tasselled wobble gongs are a nocturnal creature and thought to be ovoviviparious. Thought not a lot is known about their breeding and courting.

Thank you so much for reading this post. Tomorrow I will be blogging about the lemon shark. So I hope dear reader you will return for that. I myself absolutely love sharks and am doing a fundraising/awareness event for them. So, please do follow my just giving link to learn more about that: justgiving.com/fundraising/Kerry-Payton1

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